Mind Body Simple

Quiet Mind, Healthy Body, Simple Life

Simple Living

Ikigai

Ikigai is a concept originating in Japan that encourages people to identify their purpose in life. It combines the two Japanese words “iki” (life) and “gai” (value), and comprises four components: what you love, what the world needs, what you can be paid for, and what you are good at. When all four of these come together, it will provide an individual with their ‘ikigai’ or raison d'être; helping them to find meaning and joy within their lives. While ikigai is often associated with a deeper spiritual practice, it doesn't have to be taken so seriously - it can simply be viewed as a way to bring more enjoyment out of life's everyday moments by discovering which activities bring genuine satisfaction within our lives.


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The True Meaning of Ikigai: Definitions, Diagrams & Myths about the Japanese Life Purpose

Intentional Living

Living intentionally is really about being conscious and aware of how you spend your time, energy, and money. It's a way to cut through the noise of modern life and make sure daily choices are made with meaning and purpose. From where you shop and what you eat, to what causes you support or organizations you volunteer with, every aspect of life can be intentional when done thoughtfully. Intentional living helps to ensure that your life has more depth than just mindless habits - it gives focus and direction while maintaining a low-pressure lifestyle that still allows some flexibility for changes in interests or circumstances.


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Minimalism Introduces Us to Intentionality

Minimalism

Minimalism has become a popular lifestyle choice in recent years, with many people embracing its philosophy of simplifying their lives to focus on the few possessions that truly matter. It’s about discarding excess items so only those that have lasting value remain. This allows for a happier, less stress-filled life in which the individual can be more present and connected with what matters most — whether that’s family, meaningful work or hobbies — rather than being bogged down by all the material “stuff” you don’t need. Most importantly, minimalism can free up time and energy for others; journeys and experiences; or giving back to our communities.


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What Is Minimalism? A Practical Guide to a Minimalist Lifestyle